Monday, February 24, 2014

The Noise of the Gravediggers Who Are Burying God

Adam Gopnik:

A history of modern atheism—what did Voltaire say to Diderot? what did Comte mean to Mill? who was Madalyn Murray O’Hair, anyway?—would be nice to have. The British popular historian Peter Watson’s “The Age of Atheists: How We Have Sought to Live Since the Death of God” (Simon & Schuster) could have been that book, but it isn’t. Beginning with Nietzsche’s 1882 pronouncement that the big guy had passed and man was now out on the “open sea” of uncertainty, the book is instead an omnium-gatherum of the life and work of every modern artist or philosopher who was unsettled or provoked by the possible nonexistence of God. Watson leads us on a breakneck trip through it all—Bloomsbury and Bernard Shaw, Dostoyevsky and German Expressionism, Sigmund Freud and Pablo Picasso. 

Peter Watson has a new book out oh boy oh boy oh boy! What a glorious surprise! I don't care if the review is lukewarm, I've already ordered it.

The rest of the article is interesting in its own right, but still, the takeaway here is Peter Watson has a new book out oh boy oh boy oh boy!